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Going Vegetarian: A Healthy Guide to Making the Switch
This title covers these subjects: Nutrition., Vegetarian cooking., Vegetarianism.
Going Vegetarian: A Healthy Guide to Making the Switch
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Reviewed Titles Capstone Interactive Accelerated Reader

Going Vegetarian: A Healthy Guide to Making the Switch

Vegetarian food is good for you and for the planet. But if you're thinking of revolutionizing your diet, you need to get the facts first. Learn about the benefits and challenges of a diet that does not include red meat, poultry, or fish. Helpful tips, delicious vegetarian recipes, and how tos will make the switch so much easier. Want to change the world? Now you can, one plate at a time.

 
Dewey613.2'62
  
Reading LevelGrades 6-7
Interest LevelGrades 6-9
GRLX
Lexile Level940L
ATOS Level6.2
AR Points1
AR Quiz #148819
Early Intervention Level29
  
  
ISBN978-0-7565-4764-6
PublisherCompass Point Books
Copyright2012
  
Page Count64
LanguagesEnglish
Capstone Interactive eBook
List Price: $53.32 School/Library Price
$39.99
 


 
Additional Formats
Price: $26.49
 

Reviews

NSTA Recommends - Richard Lord, High School Biology Teacher

"Many middle and high school students consider challenging themselves to adopt a diet that is not focused on animals. This simple and informative book can help them decide if vegetarianism is right for them. There are a variety of reasons why people choose to be vegetarians. A plant–based diet is healthful, it is ecologically beneficial to eat lower on the food chain, and for some it is a cultural or religious tradition. Vegetarians are grouped into six types: Ovo–lacto vegetarians eat no meat, but eat eggs and dairy; ovo vegetarians eat eggs but no meat or dairy; lacto vegetarians eat dairy foods but no meat or eggs; pesci–vegetarians eat fish but no other meat; flexitarians eat meat occasionally, and vegans eat no animal products at all. The book is focused on the ovo–lacto vegetarian lifestyle. Disadvantages of eating meat—higher saturated fat and cholesterol and the possibility that it can harbor toxins, antibiotics, hormones and E. coli—are clearly stated. It is also noted that raising animals is a threat to forest land, uses massive amounts of water, contributes to climate change, and often involves mistreatment when animals are raised for food. Practical advice is offered to prospective vegetarians.They should take one step at a time, know why they are adopting a vegetarian lifestyle, and be prepared to compromise, check food labels, map out a meal schedule, avoid vegetarian junk food and, perhaps most importantly, respect those who have chosen not to be vegetarians. There is an explanation of how various nutrients are needed by the body and the plant sources that are rich in those nutrients. It is made clear that going vegetarian is an individual choice. Each person who wants to eat less meat must draw the line wherever s/he desires. The book is concise, enlightening, and full of stunning photography. It could easily be read from cover to cover in a short time. There are several recipes for vegetarian dishes, a short glossary, a list of print and online resources, and an index. The information is fair and balanced with none of the rigid and preachy bias that is sometimes typical of articles and books on vegetarianism. It would be appropriate for middle and high school health or biology classes as part of a nutrition unit. But, since any student considering vegetarianism would find the book useful, it would be a valuable addition to a school or classroom library." - NSTA Recommends

October 10, 2012

Library Media Connection Online - Samantha Roslund, Graduate Student and Library Assistant, University of Michigan

"Passing up the preachy, and going for a hefty serving of helpful information, Dana Meachen Rau has written manuals for teens considering making a change in their daily diets. Detailed diets address the nutritional concerns people have giving up animal products. She also discusses the importance of not burdening one’s family with different dietary choices and offers helpful suggestions like doing grocery shopping or making parts of the planned meal. The books contain insets and tables that offer simple alternatives to meat and non-organic foods, a wide variety of organic, meatless, or vegan recipes, and helpful statistics. All books include metric conversion tables for easier cooking. The series is a great addition to any middle or high school library. Recommended." - Library Media Connection Online

November 1, 2012

Dana Meachen Rau

Dana Meachen Rau

Dana Meachen Rau is an author, editor, and illustrator of children’s books. She has written more than 100 books for children, many of them nonfiction in subjects including astronomy, history, and geography, as well as numerous biographies. She lives in Burlington, Connecticut, with her husband and two children.

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