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The Incredible Rockhead vs Papercut!
This title covers these subjects: School stories., Superheroes -- Fiction., Graphic novels.
The Incredible Rockhead vs Papercut!
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Reviewed Titles Print Book Supported by Capstone Interactive Accelerated Reader
Graphic Sparks

The Incredible Rockhead vs Papercut!

Chip Stone, a.k.a. the Incredible Rockhead, has yet to meet his match -- until now. Rockhead is up against an enemy designed to defeat him -- Papercut! With the entire school watching, this paper tiger is looking to cover Rockhead in the most action-packed game of paper, rock, scissors the world has ever seen. Is this the end of our boulder-headed hero, or will Rock find a way to hammer Paper into pulp?

 
DeweyFIC
GenreFantasy & Science Fiction
  
Reading LevelGrades 1-3
Interest LevelGrades 2-5
GRLK
Lexile LevelGN520L
ATOS Level2.3
AR Points0.5
AR Quiz #137230
  
  
ISBN978-1-4342-1976-3
PublisherStone Arch Books
BrandGraphic Sparks
Copyright2011
  
Page Dimensions6" x 9"
Page Count40
LanguagesEnglish
BindingReinforced Library Binding
Hardcover
List Price: $23.99 School/Library Price
$17.99
 


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Reviews

Good Comics For Kids Blog

"The concept is a little odd, but it works: An action graphic novel based on the old rock, paper, scissors game, with superheroes taking on the attributes of all three. The action is strictly played for laughs, and the crude art gives the story a goofy vibe. This is actually the third volume in the series, but it doesn’t take much for a new reader to catch up with the story. Chip Stone is an ordinary boy who turns into The Incredible Rockhead when danger arises. Rockhead is a rather limited superhero, with more bulk than brains—think of The Incredible Hulk in second grade, played for laughs. The action gets under way when the school bully, Troy Perkins, sees an ad on TV that offers to turn him into a super-bully. Troy takes the bait, and a mysterious man gives him an injection that turns him into Papercut, a paper super-villain—and everyone knows that paper covers rock! He heads to the school and causes general chaos until Chip’s pal Spencer dons his sparkly sidekick costume and becomes Scissorlegz, quickly reducing Papercut to a string of paper dolls. That’s it. This is a pretty straightforward story without a lot of complications or side plots, so it’s easy for early readers to follow. The humor is fast-paced and smart-alecky; the only authority figure, a teacher, spends most of the story pinned to the wall while the kids get on with their battles. Jennings packs a lot of action into each panel, but the story is clearly drawn and easy to follow. Most pages have just two or three panels. This is not a wordy comic—there are a lot of word balloons and text boxes, but they are short, and the pictures really carry the story. Although the story is self-contained, there are allusions to previous books and a promise of more to come, so it’s clear to the readers that this is one of a series. The comic includes a few nods to traditional comic books—a variant cover and a couple of fake ads—as well as vocabulary and discussion sections in the back. At 36 pages, it’s a fairly short story and a good choice for kids who are not quite ready for Captain Underpants but are definitely on that wavelength. http://blog.schoollibraryjournal.com/goodcomicsforkids/2010/10/03/review-the-incredible-rockhead-vs-papercut/" - Good Comics For Kids Blog

October 3, 2010

Booklist Online - Snow Wildsmith

"In his third adventure, the Incredible Rockhead, aka Chip Stone, faces a dangerous foe: Papercut. Created when school bully Troy Perkins injects a dangerous serum, Papercut is nearly unstoppable—after all, paper always covers rock! Can Rockhead’s new sidekick save the day? The spoofed superhero elements and story of the class nerd defeating school bullies is a potent combination, even when used in a broad, over-the-top way. Readers don’t need to have read the previous books to dive into the action; Nickel’s writing is funny enough to carry them along, though some elements, such as the origin of the sidekick’s powers, are quickly glossed over. Jennings’ art is Saturday-morning-cartoon fun, with rough lines, bright colors, and purposefully distorted proportions. Such nice touches as a bogus “alternative cover” and fake ads scattered throughout add to the old-time comic-book feel. A realistically multicultural cast rounds everything out. This volume in the Graphic Sparks series makes for a cute addition to a children’s comics collection." - Booklist Online

August 1, 2010

Back to Books Blog - Nicola

"The first book in this series I really did not like at all but with the this, the third in the series, I'm more open to it's appeal for children. I still think Rockhead is a dumb superhero. He smashes things with his head, which turns into a rock, but his head is so heavy he can't move on his own and he needs a push to get started. In this story the villain Papercut is out to get Rockhead and as we all know paper covers rock (in the old game) and Rockhead may just have met his match until a new superhero comes along to help him out. And now it looks like, as in typical superhero tradition, Rockhead will now have a sidekick. Honestly, I'm not too keen on this but kids will probably find it fun especially since the book is set up like a real comic book with fake advertisements to boot! RL: 1.3. 3/5 http://back-to-books.blogspot.com/2011/01/two-easy-reader-graphic-novels-by-stone.html" - Back to Books Blog

January 13, 2011

 
Scott Nickel

Scott Nickel

Born in 1962 in Denver, Colorado, Scott Nickel works by day at Paws, inc., Jim Davis's famous Garfield studio, and he freelances by night. Burning the midnight oil, Scott has created hundreds of humorous greeting cards and written several children's books, short fiction for "Boys' Life" magazine, comic strips, and lots of really funny knock-knock jokes. He was raised in southern California, but in 1995 Scott moved to Indiana, where he currently lives with his wife, two sons, six cats, and several sea monkeys.

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