Please sign-in to...
  • Save Orders
  • View Saved Orders
  • View Order History
  • Save Wish Lists
  • Move Wish List to Cart
  • and more!
 

Do not show this message again.

 
 

You have not viewed any products recently.

 
 
Jak and the Magic Nano-beans: A Graphic Novel
Jak and the Magic Nano-beans: A Graphic Novel
Alternative Views
  • There are no alternate images available for this product.
 
Reviewed Titles Accelerated Reader
Far Out Fairy Tales

Jak and the Magic Nano-beans: A Graphic Novel

by Carl Bowen
Illustrated by Omar Lozano

Jak and her robotic servant, Cow, are in a pickle; Mom wants Jak to sell Cow for scrap, but Cow and Jak have become best friends. So instead of selling the rusty old robot for spare change, Jak strikes a bargain with the scrap collector: if Jak and Cow can visit the Cloud Kingdom via the Space Elevator and get hold of some magic nano-beans, Jak can keep Cow safe and sound. But what they find in space is anything but safe—and its sounds are far from soothing . . .

 
DeweyE
GenreFairy Tales & Fables
  
Reading LevelGrades 3-4
Interest LevelGrades 3-6
GRLS
Lexile LevelGN500L
ATOS Level2.5
AR Points0.5
AR Quiz #179393
  
Text TypeLiterature: Narrative
Text SubtypeComparison
  
ISBN978-1-4965-9091-6
PublisherStone Arch Books
BrandFar Out Fairy Tales
Copyright2016
  
Page Dimensions7" x 10"
Page Count40
LanguagesEnglish
Capstone Interactive eBook
List Price: $53.32 School/Library Price
$39.99

This item replaces the following items:
978-1-4965-3862-8
If you would like to order these items, contact Customer Service.

 
 


Sets that include this title:
 
Additional Formats
Price: $19.99
 

Reviews

Booklist - Kat Kan

"The color scheme of the cartoonish, cinematic panels helps cultivate a strong sense of location, with dusty tones on Earth and florescent hues in space. Jak and CDW make a dynamic team in this action-packed tale. Kids who love Rey in Star Wars: The Force Awakens should like Jak, too." - Booklist

April 15, 2016

Booklist - Kat Kan

"The color scheme of the cartoonish, cinematic panels helps cultivate a strong sense of location, with dusty tones on Earth and florescent hues in space. Jak and CDW make a dynamic team in this action-packed tale. Kids who love Rey in Star Wars: The Force Awakens should like Jak, too." - Booklist

April 15, 2016

Booklist - Kat Kan

"The color scheme of the cartoonish, cinematic panels helps cultivate a strong sense of location, with dusty tones on Earth and florescent hues in space. Jak and CDW make a dynamic team in this action-packed tale. Kids who love Rey in Star Wars: The Force Awakens should like Jak, too." - Booklist

April 15, 2016

 

SLJ's Good Comics for Kids - Brigid Alverson

"In the zombified version, Hansel and Gretel and their parents are zombies who live in a Disney-esque enchanted forest and live on the brains of unsuspecting tourists. They are starving because the tourist trade is drying up, but rather than abandon their children, they dress them as cute human children so they can lure in some good Samaritans and turn them into dinner. The witch does capture them and fatten up Hansel while making Gretel do all the work, but Gretel doesn’t roast her in the oven—she bites the witch and turns her into a zombie. The story ends happily with all the characters living companionably together and munching on the vegetarian brains that the witch obtains by mail order. The story of the three bears has only a tenuous connection with the original, as it features a young archaeologist investigating the tomb of King Arthur—and encountering only the king but also Queen Elizabeth I and Robin Hood, all transformed into vampires and looking at her like a delicious snack. This one features plenty of Lara Craft-esque maneuvers, as Goldilocks faces a series of booby traps and defends herself against both the vampires and a horde of spiders through the clever use of her smart phone. In Sleeping Beauty: Magic Master, the Princess Aurora doesn’t wait around for a prince to wake her up. In fact, the opposite happens: She rescues a prince. When Aurora is born, the bad fairy puts a curse on her, as in the original, but the good fairy gives her the gift of magic. The bad fairy put the rest of the kingdom to sleep, but Aurora has until her 13th birthday to learn all of magic and gather the ingredients for a magic potion that will break the spell. In her last-minute dash to get the final ingredients, she befriends a yeti who helps her out, and once the spell is broken, he turns out to be a handsome prince. Jak and the Magic Nano-Beans, a sci-fi take on Jack and the Beanstalk, is the edgiest of these books, if any Capstone book could be said to be edgy. Jak is a rebellious teenage girl with a blue Mohawk. The beanstalk is replaced by a space elevator, which all the affluent people in her society used to escape from earth, leaving a bleak landscape inhabited by people who apparently have no skills, as all the technology is starting to fall apart. Jak’s mother sits around all day drinking soda and surfing the internet, and she wants Jak to sell her best friend, a robot named Cow, for scrap. But the junkman has a better idea: He gives Jak a tube of nano-bots who repair Cow; then he sends her up to the space station at the top of the elevator in search of more. When they reach the space station, Jak and Cow find plenty of nano-bots all right, but they also encounter a giant space octopus that’s trying to gobble them all up. In this story, technology (the nano-bots) replaces both the magic beans and the gold that the original Jack brought back home. It’s an interesting point for discussion. . . . The art in all these books is outstanding. Jak and Sleeping Beauty showing a lot of manga influence in the character designs, and all four have a contemporary look that sets them apart from the usual Disney-esque fairy tale books. The artists make good use of the elements of comics, using paneling, sound effects, and different shapes and colors of word balloons to tell the story. The visual questions in the back of the books point out some of these elements, which makes the books good tools for learning the skills required to read graphic novels. While the stories are a far cry from the traditional versions, the books are entertaining in their own right, with diverse casts of characters, girls who make their own adventures, and plenty of goofy, supernatural fun." - SLJ's Good Comics for Kids

January 5, 2017

SLJ's Good Comics for Kids - Brigid Alverson

"The art in all these books is outstanding. . . .While the stories are a far cry from the traditional versions, the books are entertaining in their own right, with diverse casts of characters, girls who make their own adventures, and plenty of goofy, supernatural fun." - SLJ's Good Comics for Kids

January 5, 2017

Carl Bowen

Carl Bowen

Carl Bowen is a father, husband, and writer living in Lawrenceville, Georgia. He has published a handful of novels, short stories, and comics. For Stone Arch Books and Capstone, Carl has retold 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (by Jules Verne), The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (by Robert Louis Stevenson), The Jungle Book (by Rudyard Kipling), "Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp" (from A Thousand and One Nights), Julius Caesar (by William Shakespeare), and The Murders in the Rue Morgue (by Edgar Allan Poe). Carl's novel, Shadow Squadron: Elite Infantry, earned a starred review from Kirkus Book Reviews.

Go to the Author’s Page →

 

 

OK